kc winter

Look at this bird. This bird is cool. (Black beaked magpie) (at Crested Butte)

Look at this bird. This bird is cool. (Black beaked magpie) (at Crested Butte)

There’s a bike for just about every resident here, and absolutely none of them are locked up. It’s a little bike heaven (at Crested Butte)

There’s a bike for just about every resident here, and absolutely none of them are locked up. It’s a little bike heaven (at Crested Butte)

#nofilter #sorrynotsorry (at Crested Butte)

#nofilter #sorrynotsorry (at Crested Butte)

at Montrose Regional Airport

at Montrose Regional Airport


Wat. (at United Airlines Terminal 1 - Chicago O’Hare International Airport)

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Pine Cone Fossils (Araucaria Mirabilis), Jurassic, 160 Million years, from Santa Cruz, Patagonia, Argentina

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Pine Cone Fossils (Araucaria Mirabilis), Jurassic, 160 Million years, from Santa Cruz, Patagonia, Argentina

(Source: davesrockshop.com)

maybe i’ll get a tattoo of lace

maybe i’ll get a tattoo of lace

(Source: ghettoputa, via c0n3ja)

omgthatdress:

Dress
1885
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

*boop*

omgthatdress:

Dress

1885

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

*boop*


(Source: mrgolightly, via fuckyeah1990s)

Back in the day bitchface, probably because someone forced me to wear pink #tbt

Back in the day bitchface, probably because someone forced me to wear pink #tbt


chicagogeek:

After the Carson Pirie Scott Department Store, architect Louis Sullivan’s career went into a long decline and he received few commissions. In his early fifties and down on his luck, the remainder of his work consisted primarily of a series of small bank and commercial buildings in obscure, out-of-the-way Midwestern towns. Today these commissions (nine in total) are collectively referred to as Sullivan’s “Jewel Boxes.” The largest is about 4,600 square feet, the smallest well under 1,500 square feet. None cost more than $125,000 to build.

In 1906, Sullivan accepted an offer to design a new headquarters for the National Farmers’ Bank in Owatonna, a small farming town 60 miles south of Minneapolis. Banker Carl Bennett wanted more than a prominent new building to house his family’s business. He wanted a work of art. Together their brilliant collaboration of patron and architect produced what many consider the finest small-town bank in America, the first of Sullivan’s “jewel boxes”. The building is bathed in a symphony of color, as Sullivan described it. Green and brown terra cotta panels and blue and gold glass mosaic bands contrast with the reddish brick walls and the red sandstone base that anchors the bank to its site, giving depositors a sense of security. Two arched stained glass windows designed by Louis J. Millet are mirrored on the interior by murals of dairy and harvest scenes by Oskar Gross. The lavish organic decorative elements, including four 18-foot-tall cast iron electroliers and teller window grilles, were designed by chief draftsman George Grant Elmslie and cast by Winslow Brothers Company (owned by William Winslow, for whom Frank Lloyd Wright designed an iconic house). Today this National Historic Landmark is a Wells Fargo Bank.

Burn it with fi—oh shit nope!

Burn it with fi—oh shit nope!

printedjewelry:

Studio Luminaire 

printedjewelry:

Studio Luminaire 


(via fuckyeah1990s)

I bought another book. Damn I really want to get that bird tattoo now

I bought another book. Damn I really want to get that bird tattoo now

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